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 Update: Fingerprints required for a top-up...

Thai government proposes extreme measures to control phone users and social media companies


Link Here 18th July 2017  full story: Internet Censorship in Thailand...Thailand implements mass website blocking
NBTC logoInternational over-the-top (OTT) content providers have been the bane of Thai regulator National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission's (NBTC) existence over the past few months.

The supposedly independent communications censor seems to be obsessed with finding ways to curb the likes of Facebook, Google, YouTube and Alibaba. In early April it boldly suggested imposing some kind of bandwidth fee on the consumption of OTT services, requiring OTT players to have an operating licence to run a business in Thailand and even making them pay a value-added service tax for transactions by local merchants.

The head of the broadcasting committee, Natee Sukonrat, was quoted as saying users on social media who influence public opinion will have to be reined in.

What on the surface may seem to be an effort to create a more level playing field for the mobile players could also be seen as a thinly disguised attempt to give the regulator the power to more easily monitor and censor content the government is finding difficult to regulate. The widely-criticised proposals are merely a backhanded move to bypass current legal processes and give the regulator the authority to demand the removal of content the military-run government considers illegal without waiting for a court order, which the government has complained is time consuming.

Facebook and co would not play ball with Thai government requests and the government was forced drop the plan to register OTT players for tax purposes. However the government said that it would push ahead to replace several weak points in the censorship process and come up with a revised proposal in 30 days.

And now the junta's ominously named National Reform Steering Assembly this month approved an 84-page social media censorship proposal, which would require such things as fingerprint and facial scanning just to top-up a prepaid plan, all in an effort to be able to identify those posting content to OTT services. The push for fingerprint and facial recognition is in addition to existing requirements for all SIM users to register with their 13-digit national IDs.

Commentators say the stringent rules are similar to those in use in China and Iran.

 

 Offsite Article: Over blocking...


Link Here 16th July 2017  full story: Internet Censorship in China...All pervading Chinese internet censorship
purevpn banner China moves towards banning VPNs use to circumvent internet blocking but say that this is not a total ban on all VPNs

See article from torrentfreak.com

 

 Offsite Article: A Korean Punk Band's Struggles with Censorship...


Link Here 12th July 2017
bamseom pirates seoul inferno Jung Yoon-Suk's documentary Bamseom Pirates Seoul Inferno tells the story of the arrest of the band's producer after posting controversial tweets.

See article from hyperallergic.com

 

  Censorship on demand...

China bans homosexuality, prostitution and drug addiction from online videos


Link Here 4th July 2017  full story: Internet Censorship in China...All pervading Chinese internet censorship

China flagNew censorship rules issued by Bejing will prohibit portrayals of homosexuality, prostitution and drug addiction in online videos. The China Netcasting Services Association (CNSA) is targeting what they consider abnormal sexual activity.

The rules which were issued on Friday demand that online video platforms hire at least three professional censors. They were ordered to view entire programmes and take down any considered not sticking to the correct political and aesthetic standards.

Those who don't adhere to the new rules face being reported to the police for further investigation, according to Xhinua state news agency.

 

  Censor doesn't obtain consent before violating the rights of gamers...

The New Zealand film censor bans the video game, Criminal Girls: Invite Only


Link Here 30th June 2017
Criminal Girls: Invite Only The New Zealand censor at the Office of Film and Literature Censorship has just banned the PlayStation Vita role playing game, Criminal Girls: Invite Only

The censor explained the reasons for the ban on its website:

Firstly, the Classification Office called the game in due to concerns that the sexual content found within the game focuses on young persons and involves elements of sexual violence. However the Motivation sequences themselves do not encourage the player to focus on the girls as young persons, and instead concentrates on presenting their embarrassment, powerlessness and humiliation in a sexualised manner. The dialogue clearly establishes that the girls are either unwilling to participate, or naive about the player character's intentions. Then, once the Motivation is finished, the girls' reaction is positive. The lack of consent presented here - and the idea that Even if you have to force her 203 she'll end up enjoying it - is a narrative that justifies rape and is presented solely for titillation.

This game requires players to engage with the female characters in sexualised situations where consent is not only absent, but where the protestations of the female characters are part of the attraction. There is a strong likelihood of injury to the public good, including to adults from the trivialisation and normalisation of such behaviour, so the game is banned.

The game is PEGI 18 rated in Europe and ESRB M rated in the US.

 

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